McLoud Elementary School

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Counseling » Bullying

Bullying

 What is bullying?

 

Bullying can be defined as unwanted, aggressive behavior among school aged children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time.

In order to be considered bullying, the behavior must be aggressive and include:
  • An Imbalance of Power: Kids who bully use their power—such as physical strength, access to embarrassing information, or popularity—to control or harm others. Power imbalances can change over time and in different situations, even if they involve the same people.
  • Repetition: Bullying behaviors happen more than once or have the potential to happen more than once.
  • Bullying includes actions such as making threats, spreading rumors, attacking someone physically or verbally, and excluding someone from a group on purpose.

The following definitions are defined in the Oklahoma School Security Act to help recognize bullying behavior:

 

“Harassment, intimidation, and bullying means any gesture, written or verbal expression, electronic communication, or physical act that a reasonable person should know will harm another student, damage another student’s property, place another student in reasonable fear of harm to the student’s person or damage to the student’s property, or insult or demean any student or group of students in such a way as to disrupt or interfere with the school’s educational mission or the education of any student.”

 

“Threatening behavior means any pattern of behavior or isolated action, whether or not it is directed at another person, that a reasonable person would believe indicates potential for future harm to students, school personnel, or school property.”

 

Bullying has a negative effect on the social environment of schools, creates a climate of fear among students, inhibits the ability to learn, and leads to other antisocial behavior.  Other detrimental effects of bullying include impact on school safety, student engagement, and the overall school environment.  Oklahoma state law declares that any form, type, or level of bullying is prohibited, and that every incident of behavior that may constitute bullying should be taken seriously by school administrators, school staff (including teachers), students, and parents.

 

Bullying has serious and lasting effects. Research has found bullying behavior causes increased mental health problems, increased thoughts of suicide, retaliation through extremely violent measures, decreased academic achievement, higher risk of abusing alcohol and other drugs, and truancy.

What are the warning signs of bullying? 

 

There are many warning signs that could indicate that a student is involved in bullying, either by bullying others or by being bullied. However, these warning signs may indicate other issues or problems, as well.  Below is a list of common signs:

Being Bullied:

  • Reluctant to go to school or certain places.
  • Silent about what is happening at school.
  • Frequent lost or damaged possessions.
  • Academic problems.
  • Difficulty concentrating.
  • Low self-esteem.
  • Social isolation.
  • Quiet, depressed, irritable, or anxious.

Bullying Others:

  • Gets into physical or verbal fights with others.
  • Enjoys putting others down.
  • Has extra money or new belongings that cannot be explained.
  • Disrespects authority and disregards rules.
  • Has an attitude of superiority.
  • Quick to blame others.
  • Needs to have power or control over others.
  • Enjoys violence.

How to Talk About Bullying

Parents, school staff, and other caring adults have a role to play in preventing bullying. They can: 

Help Kids Understand Bullying

Kids who know what bullying is can better identify it. They can talk about bullying if it happens to them or others. Kids need to know ways to safely stand up to bullying and how to get help.

  • Encourage kids to speak to a trusted adult if they are bullied or see others being bullied. The adult can give comfort, support, and advice, even if they can’t solve the problem directly. Encourage the child to report bullyingif it happens.
  • Talk about how to stand up to kids who bully. Give tips, like using humor and saying “stop” directly and confidently. Talk about what to do if those actions don’t work, like walking away.
  • Talk about strategies for staying safe, such as staying near adults or groups of other kids.
  • Urge them to help kids who are bulliedby showing kindness or getting help.
  • Watch the short webisodesand discuss them with kids.

Keep the Lines of Communication Open

 

Research tells us that children really do look to parents and caregivers for advice and help on tough decisions. Sometimes spending 15 minutes a day talking can reassure kids that they can talk to their parents if they have a problem. Start conversations about daily life and feelings with questions like these:

  • What was one good thing that happened today? Any bad things?
  • What is lunch time like at your school? Who do you sit with? What do you talk about?
  • What is it like to ride the school bus?
  • What are you good at? What would do you like best about yourself?
  • Talking about bullying directly is an important step in understanding how the issue might be affecting kids. There are no right or wrong answers to these questions, but it is important to encourage kids to answer them honestly. Assure kids that they are not alone in addressing any problems that arise. Start conversations about bullying with questions like these:
  • What does “bullying” mean to you?
  • Describe what kids who bully are like. Why do you think people bully?
  • Who are the adults you trust most when it comes to things like bullying?
  • Have you ever felt scared to go to school because you were afraid of bullying? What ways have you tried to change it?
  • What do you think parents can do to help stop bullying?
  • Have you or your friends left other kids out on purpose? Do you think that was bullying? Why or why not?
  • What do you usually do when you see bullying going on?
  • Do you ever see kids at your school being bullied by other kids? How does it make you feel?
  • Have you ever tried to help someone who is being bullied? What happened? What would you do if it happens again?
  • Get more ideas for talking with childrenabout life and about bullying. If concerns come up, be sure to respond.
  • There are simple ways that parents and caregivers can keep up-to-date with kids’ lives. 
  • Read class newsletters and school flyers. Talk about them at home.
  • Check the school website
  • Go to school events
  • Greet the bus driver
  • Meet teachers and counselors at “Back to School” night or reach out by email
  • Share phone numbers with other kids’ parents
  • Teachers and school staffalso have a role to play. 

Encourage Kids to Do What They Love

 

Help kids take part in activities, interests, and hobbies they like. Kids can volunteer, play sports, sing in a chorus, or join a youth group or school club. These activities give kids a chance to have fun and meet others with the same interests. They can build confidence and friendships that help protect kids from bullying.

Model How to Treat Others with Kindness and Respect

 

Kids learn from adults’ actions. By treating others with kindness and respect, adults show the kids in their lives that there is no place for bullying. Even if it seems like they are not paying attention, kids are watching how adults manage stress and conflict, as well as how they treat their friends, colleagues, and families.

Please note most of this information was taken directly from the Oklahoma State Department of Education website or the National Stop Bullying website.    For more information please visit:

"I will speak ill of no man and speak the good I know of everybody."
- Ben Franklin
 

If you or someone you know is being bullied please be sure to report it to your school.  You can report it to your child’s teacher, principal, or counselor, or there is a form on your school’s website under Counselor’s Corner tab you may submit. 

Approximately 40% to 80% of school-age children experience bullying at some point during their school career.  

 

Only 20%-40% of bullying victims actually report being bullied. 

Bullying can affect you in many ways. You may lose sleep or feel sick. You may want to skip school. If you are feeling hopeless or helpless or know someone that is, please call the LIFELINE at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) .
"Do unto others as you would have them do unto you."
-The Golden Rule